Fundamentals of Philosophy

Series
Pearson
Author
David Stewart / H. Gene Blocker / James Petrik  
Publisher
Pearson
Cover
Softcover
Edition
8
Language
English
Total pages
544
Pub.-date
February 2012
ISBN13
9780205242993
ISBN
0205242995
Related Titles



Description

&>Thematically introduces students to the major philosophic thinkers.

 

Fundamentals of Philosophy offers a broad scope of classic and contemporary selections from the world’s major thinkers via a narrative format that presents difficult issues and readings in a simplified manner for students.

 

Its readings are grouped around nine major themes/chapters, and are organized as a debate on one central issue. This approach helps students understand the argumentative style of philosophy, and learn how philosophic issues and solutions they encounter can be applied to their everyday life.

 

A better teaching and learning experience
This program will provide a better teaching and learning experience–for you and your students. Here’s how:

  • Improve Critical Thinking — “Questions for Discussion” and a “Glossary of Terms” help students study.
  • Engage Students — “Biographies” and “Recent Developments” stimulate student interest and understanding of philosophy’s contemporary applications.
  • Support Instructors — An Instructor’s Manual to accompany the text are available.

Features

THEMATICALLY INTRODUCES STUDENTS TO THE MAJOR PHILOSOPHIC THINKERS.

  • Fundamentals of Philosophy includes more material than can be covered in a single academic term, so instructors have options for their course.  (ex. p. ix)
  • The readings are grouped around nine major themes/chapters (listed below) and are organized as a debate on one central issue:
    • What is Philosophy? 
    • Thinking About Thinking (Logic)
    • What is Real? (Metaphysics)
    • How Do We Know? (Epistemology)
    • What Ought We to Do? (Ethics)
    • Philosophy of Religion
    • Philosophy of Art (Aesthetics)
    • Social and Political Philosophy
    • Eastern Thought
  • Chapter 3 (Philosophy’s History) gives students an introduction to the history of ideas.  (ex. p. 17)
  • Thomas A. Shipka’s “Are You a Critical Thinker” in Chapter 8 (Strategies for Philosophical Argument)provides students with a discussion of techniques essential to thinking about philosophical concepts.
  • The section on logical and analytical techniques presents students with discussions and readings on necessary and sufficient conditions, inductive arguments, casual reasoning, definition, analysis, and the difference between truth and validity. (ex. p. 46)
  • The section on Eastern thought focuses on philosophical rather than religious issues in Eastern thought. (ex. p. 475)


IMPROVE CRITICAL THINKING

  • Questions for Discussion within each chapter encourage students to understand philosophy as a living discipline. (ex. p. 55)
  • A Glossary of Terms provides easy access to important terminology. (ex. p. 519)

ENGAGE STUDENTS

  • Biographies and pictures of all major philosophers stimulate interest in the issues by situating each philosopher’s position within the context of his/her life. (ex. p. 342)
  • “Recent Developments” in each chapter help students understand the contemporary applications of philosophy. (ex. p. 418)

SUPPORT INSTRUCTORS

  • The Instructor’s Manual includes a brief overview, suggested classroom activities, suggested answers to the “Questions for Discussion” in each chapter, and a test bank of questions with answers.
  • Create a Custom Text: For enrollments of at least 25, create your own textbook by combining chapters from best-selling Pearson textbooks and/or reading selections in the sequence you want. To begin building your custom text, visit www.pearsoncustomlibrary.com. You may also work with a dedicated Pearson Custom editor to create your ideal text–publishing your own original content or mixing and matching Pearson content. Contact your Pearson Publisher’s Representative to get started.

New to this Edition

Found in this Section:

1. Overview of Changes

2. Chapter-by-Chapter Changes


1. Overview of Changes

 

THEMATICALLY INTRODUCES STUDENTS TO THE MAJOR PHILOSOPHIC THINKERS.

  • Chapter 20 (Moral Skepticism) is new to the 8th edition.
    • The chapter considers philosophers like Friedrich Nietzsche who are skeptical of the core of traditional morality. It also discusses other philosophers like J.L. Mackie who are skeptical of the existence of objective moral facts.  (ex. p. 248)
    • A selection from J.L. Mackie’s “Ethics: Inventing Right and Wrong” is included, as is a reconstruction and evaluation of Mackie’s argument from relativity.  (ex. p. 254)
  • Chapter 21 (Morality and Metaphysics) is also new to the 8th edition.
    • The centerpiece of the chapter is an article by Matthew Jordan on whether morality is dependent on the existence of God. (ex. p. 265)
    • The chapter includes analysis of ordinary commitment to the existence of objective moral facts.  (ex. p. 261)
    • The authors consider non-naturalism, intuitionalism, and divine command theory in their discussions. (ex. p. 263)
  • Expanded coverage of traditional issues in metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics. (ex. p. 74)
  • The discussion of philosophy and pop culture for this edition has been condensed and now focuses on connections made to specific issues within the various chapters. (ex. p. 386)


SUPPORT INSTRUCTORS

  • The Instructor’s Manual was revised to reflect changes in the 8th edition. 
  • Create a Custom Text: For enrollments of at least 25, create your own textbook by combining chapters from best-selling Pearson textbooks and/or reading selections in the sequence you want. To begin building your custom text, visit www.pearsoncustomlibrary.com. You may also work with a dedicated Pearson Custom editor to create your ideal text—publishing your own original content or mixing and matching Pearson content. Contact your Pearson Publisher’s Representative to get started.

2. Chapter-by-Chapter Changes

 

Chapter 9: Introduction to Metaphysics

  • The information on Plato’s metaphysics has been expanded to include discussion his account of human nature.
  • A selection on the immateriality of the soul from Plato’s “Phaedo” has been added.

 

Chapter 15: René Descartes: The Quest for Certainty

  • This chapter now includes an extended discussion of the theistic foundations to Descartes’ epistemology.
  • New commentary explains the role played by Descartes’ proofs for God’s existence and the authenticity in his epistemology.
  • A substantial selection from the Third Mediation has been added.

Chapter 16: David Hume: Trust Your Senses

  • This chapter was expanded to include an explanation of Hume’s classification of perceptions and his “copy principle.”
  • A selection from section II of Hume’s “Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding” was added.

 

Chapter 17: A Compromise

  • The discussion of Kant’s epistemology now includes expanded treatment of his classification of judgments.
  • Discussion of Kant’s Copernican Revolution in epistemology has been expanded.
  • The selection from the Introduction to Kant’s “Critique of Pure Reason” has been expanded to include passages in which Kant discusses the place of synthetic a priori judgments in mathematics, the natural sciences, and traditional metaphysics.

Chapter 19: Introduction to Ethical Reasoning

  • The section on why one should be moral has been eliminated. Some of the material, including the discussion of Nietzsche, was moved to the new chapter on moral skepticism.

Table of Contents

Part 1:  What is Philosophy?

Chapter 1:  The Activity of Philosophy

Chapter 2:  Philosophy's History

Chapter 3:  Philosophy and the Examined Life

Part 2:  Thinking About Thinking (Logic)

Chapter 4:  The Life of Reason

Chapter 5:  Argument Forms

Chapter 6:  Induction and the Philosophy of Science

Chapter 7:  Strategies for Philosophical Arguments

Part 3:  What is Real?  (Metaphysics)

Chapter 8:  Introduction to Metaphysics

Chapter 9:  Dualism

Chapter 10:  Materialism

Chapter 11:  Idealism

Chapter 12:  The Mind-Body Problem and Personal Identity

Chapter 13:  Freedom and Determinism:  The Metaphysics of Human Agency

Part 4:  How Do We Know?  (Epistemology)

Chapter 14:  Introduction to Epistemology

Chapter 15:  Rene Descartes:  The Quest for Certainty

Chapter 16:  David Hume:  Trust Your Senses

Chapter 17:  Immanuel Kant:  A Compromise

Chapter 18:  Knowledge and Human Practices

Part 5: What Ought We to Do?  (Ethics)

Chapter 19:  Introduction to Ethical Reasoning

Chapter 20:  Moral Skepticism

Chapter 21:  Morality and Metaphysics

Chapter 22:  Endaemonism:  The Morality of Self-Realization

Chapter 23:  Utilitarianism:  Morality Depends on the Consequences

Chapter 24:  Deontology:  Morality Depends on the Motives

Part 6:  Philosophy of Religion

Chapter 25:  Introduction to Philosophy of Religion

Chapter 26:  Religion and Life's Meaning

Chapter 27:  A Priori</emphasis> Arguments for God's Existence

Chapter 28:  A Posteriori</emphasis> Arguments for God's Existence: Aquinas' Five Ways

Chapter 29:  The Problem of Evil

Part 7:  Philosophy of Art (Esthetics)

Chapter 30:  Introduction to the Philosophy of Art

Chapter 31:  The Value of Art

Chapter 32:  Art as Ideal

Chapter 33:  Esthetics and Ideology

Part 8:  Social and Political Philosophy

Chapter 34:  Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy

Chapter 35:  The Liberal, Secular State

Chapter 36:  The Individual and the State

Chapter 37:  Human Rights

Chapter 38:  Individual Happiness and Social Responsibility

Part 9:  Eastern Thought

Chapter 39:  Philosophy East and West

Chapter 40: Confucian Theories of Human Nature

Chapter 41:  Hindu Debate on Monism

Chapter 42:  Buddhist Theory of Emptiness


Instructor Resources