Educational Psychology: Pearson New International Edition:Developing Learners - Jeanne Ellis Ormrod - 9781292041162 - Education - Educational Psychology - Pearson Schweiz AG - Der Fachverlag fuer Bildungsmedien - 978-1-2920-4116-2

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Educational Psychology: Pearson New International Edition:Developing Learners

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title:   Educational Psychology: Pearson New International Edition:Developing Learners
series:   Imprint unbekannt
author:   Jeanne Ellis Ormrod
publisher:   Pearson
cover:   Softcover
edition:   8
language:   English
total pages:   584
pub.-date:   November 2013
ISBN13:   9781292041162
ISBN10:   1-29204-116-1
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Educational Psychology: Pearson New International Edition:Developing Learners

Description

Were you looking for the book with access to MyEducationLab? This product is the book alone, and does NOT come with access to MyEducationLab. Buy the book and access card package to save money on this resource.

 

Helps students understand their own learning and apply the core concepts and principles of educational psychology.  Educational Psychology: Developing Learners is known for its exceptionally clear and engaging writing, its in-depth focus on learning, and its extensive concrete applications.  Its unique approach helps students understand concepts by examining their own learning and then showing them how to apply these concepts as teachers.  More than any other educational psychology text, this text moves seamlessly between theory and applications, features the most extensive and integrated coverage of diversity, contexts of learning, neuropsychology and brain development, and classroom applications of technology. It includes innumerable concrete examples to help readers connect educational psychology to real children and classrooms.

 

From reviews of the book:

“Rather than simply presenting the necessary content, the author makes you feel like she is talking directly to you. . . .  I love that diversity that has been woven throughout the fabric of this text. . . .  Ormrod’s personalized writing style will reach undergraduate students in a way that few authors can. [The book] is concise, yet thorough; comprehensive, yet unpretentious.”

--Angela Bloomquist, California University of Pennsylvania

 

‘Compared to other texts, Ormrod’s text is written in a more accessible way. . . .  Strengths [include] accessibility, good use of supplementary materials, [and] updated research.”

--David Yun Dai,  University at Albany, SUNY

 

“Love how each chapter discusses diversity and special needs! . . . Most students keep this text throughout their teaching careers as a resource.  Of all the educational psychology textbooks that I’ve used, this one is the most comprehensive and interactive with vivid examples. . . . The supplemental materials are very useful. The power point is extensive and easy to use for lecture.  I use the test bank materials and find the questions to be aligned with students’ licensure exams.”

--Cindy Ballantyne, Northern Arizona University

 


Features

  • Focuses on the core concepts and principles of educational psychology
    • Each chapter now begins with Learning Outcomes that are revisited in a final “What Have You Learned?”summary section.
    • Principles and core concepts are summarized in Principles/Assumptions tables that also include educational implications and concrete examples.
  • Experiencing Firsthand exercises help students observe principles of educational psychology in themselves.
  • Developmental Trends tables summarize age-typical characteristics at four grade levels (K–2, 3–5, 6–8, and 9–12) and offer suggested classroom strategies for each level. New “example” columns have been added to the tables to illustrate some of the characteristics presented.
  • Into the Classroom and Creating a Productive Classroom Environment boxes suggest and illustrate strategies related to particular areas of concern for teachers.
  • Suggested classroom strategies—within the text, in tables, and in the margins—are illustrated with apple icons.
  • Video examples referenced in margin notes allow students to explore the principles of educational psychology through the actions and words of children and adolescents from various age groups.
  • Case studies and real artifacts from children’s journals and school assignments help illustrate the principles of educational psychology with real-life examples.
  • Provides readers with opportunities to practice applying concepts and principles
  • All chapters end with Practice for Your Licensure Exam exercisesdesigned to resemble the kinds of case-study questions that appear on many teacher licensure tests.
  • The online resource, MyEducationLab, provides students with opportunities to apply the core concepts and principles and build their teaching skills by completing interactive exercises.
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New to this Edition

This eighth edition of Educational Psychology: Developing Learners retains features that have made it so popular with both instructors and students–for example, its engaging writing style and emphasis on classroom applications–but has significantly increased coverage in three areas:

  • Social, cultural, and academic contexts of learning- Users of previous editions will notice a new Chapter 8, “Learning and Cognition in Context,” which draws heavily from contemporary contextual theories as it describes the multiple contexts (e.g., immediate physical and social environment, culture and society) that directly and/or indirectly affect classroom learning and achievement. This new chapter also includes a section on academic content domains as specific contexts in which thinking and learning may be uniquely situated.
  • Neuropsychology and brain development and its relevance to classroom practice- Findings from research are updated in numerous places throughout the book, but this increased emphasis is most obvious in the addition of five new “Applying Brain Research” boxes in Chapters 2, 3, 6, 10, and 11.
  • Technological innovations and their classroom applications- Recent innovations in technology are included in many chapters but are especially apparent in the sections “Technology and Peer Relationships” (Chapter 3); “Technological Innovations,” including a subsection on fostering students’ technological literacy (Chapter 8); “Creating a Class Website to Share Goals and Facilitate Communication Throughout the School Year,” “Using Instructional Websites” “Using Technology to Individualize Instruction,” “Using Computer Simulations and Games,” “Conducting Technology-Based Collaborative Learning Activities” (all in Chapter 12); and “Using Digital Technologies in Classroom Assessments” (Chapter 14).
  • Changes across Chapters- All chapters are now written to stand alone and so can be read in whatever order an instructor prefers. Also, each chapter begins with four to six Learning Outcomes that are revisited in a final “What Have You Learned?” summary section. And the Developmental Trends tables that appear in most chapters now have an “Example” column to illustrate characteristics listed for the K—2, 3—5, 6—8, and 9—12 grade levels.
  • Chapter-by-Chapter Changes:
    • Chapter 1: New opening case study illustrating action research; revisions to the OOPS test items to reflect common misconceptions about the brain and technology; new discussions of quasi-experimental and mixed-methods research; an additional study-strategy recommendation.
    • Chapter 2: Expansion of section on Bronfenbrenner’s theory to include the idea of the environment as a dynamic system; new Applying Brain Research feature “Taking Developmental Changes in the Brain into Account”; expansion of the section on Vygotsky’s theory to include the concept of appropriation; new section contrasting Piaget’s and Vygotsky’s theories.
    • Chapter 3: New discussions of effortful control, mirror neurons, and cheating; new Applying Brain Research feature “Understanding and Addressing Adolescent Risk Taking”; new Experiencing Firsthand exercise on bullying.
    • Chapter 4: New discussion of verbal assertiveness in the section on cultural and ethnic differences; new “Experience with Technology” subsection in the section on gender differences; additional recommendations for creating a culturally inclusive classroom and addressing students’ stereotypes and prejudices.
    • Chapter 5: New sections on “Developmental Views of Intelligence” and “Intelligence and the Brain”; increased discussion of assistive technologies for students with disabilities; new recommendation regarding addressing gifted students’ emotional needs.
    • Chapter 6: Inclusion of the section on misconceptions and conceptual change that was in the “old” Chapter 7; addition of contextual theories to Table 6.1; new discussion of cognitive load as a key term.
    • Chapter 7 (Chapter 8 in the seventh edition): Section on problem solving reorganized around a general model of problem solving; new discussion of metacognitive processes in creativity.
    • Chapter 8 (new chapter): Explicit focus on various broad contexts that both shape and situate learning and cognition; new section on assumptions of contextual theories including situated learning, distributed cognition, social constructivism, and sociocultural theory as key terms), with a new Principles/Assumptions table; sections on the important roles of social interactions with both more experienced individuals and equal-ability peers, as well as a section on communities of learners (all adapted from the “old” Chapter 7); new section on cultures as contexts, including discussions of worldviews and communities of practice; new section on society and technology as contexts, including authentic activities (moved from the “old” Chapter 7) and technological innovations; new section on content domains (literacy, math, science, social studies) as contexts, with a new Developmental Trends table on reading development.
    • Chapter 9: Inclusion of operant conditioning as a key term (to the dismay of some users, it was replaced with the broader term instrumental conditioning in the seventh edition), with a discussion of how operant conditioning is essentially the “reinforcement” half of instrumental conditioning; new discussion of schoolwide positive behavior support.
    • Chapter 10: Broadened definition of modeling to include verbal instructions (in keeping with Bandura’s use of the term); addition of outcome expectations and coping model as key terms; addition of a learner’s current emotional state as a factor influencing self-efficacy; broadened view of co-regulated learning to include collaboration with peers; new Applying Brain Research feature “Understanding and Accommodating Individual Differences in Self-Regulation”; new recommendations and examples added to both Into the Classroom features.
    • Chapter 11: Revamped introductory section to include three general principles of motivation; new “Contextual Theories” row in Table 11.1 to replace and subsume the “Sociocultural Theories” row of the seventh edition; additions of doing-just-enough goals, long-term life goals, and boredom as important factors in motivation and/or affect; revision of six “TARGET” mnemonic to seven “TARGETS” principles (including “social support”).
    • Chapter 12: Reorganization of the chapter, now with a “General Principles” section at the beginning and later discussions of instructional strategies divided into “Teacher-Directed” and “Learner-Directed” sections; new figure illustrating the general nature of backward design (Figure 12.2); new discussions of the Common Core standards, Wiggins and McTighe’s (2005) six facets of understanding, and recent technological innovations in instruction (e.g., class discussion boards and chat rooms, educational videogames).
    • Chapter 13: Discussion of arranging a classroom to monitor and support students’ use of individual laptops or computer tablets; discussion of schoolwide positive behavior support (which needs to be in this chapter as well as in Chapter 9); a class website as a possible additional mechanism for communicating with parents (appropriate only when parents have knowledge of and access to the Internet, of course).
    • Chapter 14: Reorganization of the chapter to give more prominence and visibility to formative assessment and use of rubrics (the terms formative evaluation and summative evaluation now changed to formative assessment and summative assessment to be in keeping with current usage); addition of response to intervention and curriculum-based measurement as key terms; new “Comments” column added to Table 14.2 to address considerations regarding formative versus summative assessments; new section on “Using Digital Technologies in Classroom Assessments.”
    • Chapter 15: New discussions of NCE scores and the issue of addressing late and missing assignments in determination of final grades; updated discussions of standardized achievement test results (including a new Figure 15.12) and NCLB; new Figure 15.13 that can help parents understand stanines and NCE scores.
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Table of Contents

Brief Table of Contents

 

Chapter 1: TEACHING AND EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY  

  

PART I. DEVELOPMENT AND DIVERSITY

Chapter 2: COGNITIVE AND LINGUISTIC DEVELOPMENT   

Chapter 3: PERSONAL AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT   

Chapter 4: GROUP DIFFERENCES  

Chapter 5: INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES AND SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS


PART II. LEARNING AND MOTIVATION

Chapter 6: LEARNING, COGNITION, AND MEMORY   

Chapter 7: COMPLEX COGNITIVE PROCESSES

Chapter 8: LEARNING AND COGNITION IN CONTEXT

Chapter 9: BEHAVIORIST VIEWS OF LEARNING

Chapter 10: SOCIAL COGNITIVE VIEWS OF LEARNING

Chapter 11: MOTIVATION AND AFFECT  

  

PART III. CLASSROOM STRATEGIES

Chapter 12: INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES   

Chapter 13: CREATING A PRODUCTIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

Chapter 14: CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES  

Chapter 15: SUMMARIZING STUDENTS’ ACHIEVEMENT AND ABILITIES

 

APPENDICES

Appendix A: DESCRIBING ASSOCIATIONS WITH CORRELATION COEFFICIENTS

Appendix B: DETERMINING RELIABILITY AND PREDICTIVE VALIDITY

Appendix C: MATCHING BOOK AND MYEDUCATIONLAB CONTENT TO THE PRAXIS PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING AND TEACHING TESTS

 

 

 

Detailed Table of Contents:

 

Chapter 1: TEACHING AND EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

CASE STUDY: THE “NO D” POLICY   

TEACHING AS EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE   

UNDERSTANDING AND INTERPRETING RESEARCH FINDINGS   

   Quantitative Research  

   Qualitative Research  

   Interpreting Research Results: A Cautionary Note   

   From Research to Practice: The Importance of Theories   

COLLECTING DATA AND DRAWING CONCLUSIONS ABOUT YOUR OWN

   STUDENTS

   Assessing Students’ Achievements and Behaviors  

   Conducting Action Research

DEVELOPING AS A TEACHER

STRATEGIES FOR STUDYING AND LEARNING EFFECTIVELY  

WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED?  

PRACTICE FOR YOUR LICENSURE EXAM: NEW SOFTWARE  

 

 

PART I. DEVELOPMENT AND DIVERSITY

 

 

Chapter 2: COGNITIVE AND LINGUISTIC DEVELOPMENT

CASE STUDY: APPLE TARTS  

GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

   The Multiple Layers of Environmental Influence: Bronfenbrenner’s Theory  

ROLE OF THE BRAIN IN LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT   

PIAGET’S THEORY OF COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT

   Piaget’s Basic Assumptions   

   Piaget’s Stages of Cognitive Development  

   Critiquing Piaget’s Theory  

   Considering Diversity from the Perspective of Piaget’s Theory

   Contemporary Extensions and Applications of Piaget’s Theory

VYGOTSKY’S THEORY OF COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT  

   Vygotsky’s Basic Assumptions  

   Critiquing Vygotsky’s Theory

   Considering Diversity from the Perspective of Vygotsky’s Theory   

   Contemporary Extensions and Applications of Vygotsky’s Theory   

   Contrasting Piaget’s and Vygotsky’s Theories   

LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT   

   Theoretical Issues Regarding Language Development

   Diversity in Language Development

   Second-Language Learning and English Language Learners   

WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED?  

PRACTICE FOR YOUR LICENSURE EXAM: STONES LESSON  

 

 

Chapter 3: PERSONAL AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT   

CASE STUDY: HIDDEN TREASURE

PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT

   Temperament   

   Environmental Influences on Personality Development   

   The “Big Five” Personality Traits  

   Temperament, Personality, and Goodness of Fit

DEVELOPMENT OF A SENSE OF SELF   

   Factors Influencing Sense of Self  

   Developmental Changes in Sense of Self

   Diversity in Sense of Self

DEVELOPMENT OF PEER RELATIONSHIPS AND INTERPERSONAL UNDERSTANDINGS 

   Roles of Peers in Children’s Development  

   Characteristics of Peer Relationships   

   Social Cognition   

   Aggression   

   Technology and Peer Relationships  

   Diversity in Peer Relationships and Social Cognition   

   Promoting Healthy Peer Relationships

MORAL AND PROSOCIAL DEVELOPMENT   

   Developmental Trends in Morality and Prosocial Behavior  

   Factors Influencing Moral and Prosocial Development

   Diversity in Moral and Prosocial Development

   Encouraging Moral and Prosocial Development in the Classroom

WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED?   

PRACTICE FOR YOUR LICENSURE EXAM: THE SCARLET LETTER  

 


Chapter 4: GROUP DIFFERENCES

CASE STUDY: WHY JACK WASN’T IN SCHOOL   

CULTURAL AND ETHNIC DIFFERENCES

   Navigating Different Cultures at Home and at School  

   Examples of Cultural and Ethnic Diversity   

   Creating a Culturally Inclusive Classroom Environment  

GENDER DIFFERENCES

   Research Findings Regarding Gender Differences  

   Origins of Gender Differences

   Making Appropriate Accommodations for Gender Differences

SOCIOECONOMIC DIFFERENCES  

   Challenges Associated with Poverty   

   Fostering Resilience   

   Working with Homeless Students  

STUDENTS AT RISK

   Characteristics of Students at Risk  

   Why Students Drop Out  

   Supporting Students at Risk

WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED?   

PRACTICE FOR YOUR LICENSURE EXAM: THE ACTIVE AND THE PASSIVE  

 

 

Chapter 5: INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES AND SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL

NEEDS   

CASE STUDY: TIM  

INTELLIGENCE  

   Theoretical Perspectives of Intelligence

   Measuring Intelligence   

   Nature and Nurture in the Development of Intelligence  

   Cultural and Ethnic Diversity in Intelligence

   Being Smart about Intelligence and IQ Scores   

COGNITIVE STYLES AND DISPOSITIONS

EDUCATING STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS IN GENERAL EDUCATION CLASSROOMS  

   Public Law 94-142: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

   Potential Benefits and Drawbacks of Inclusion

   Identifying Students’ Special Needs: Response to Intervention and People-First

   Language   

STUDENTS WITH SPECIFIC COGNITIVE OR ACADEMIC DIFFICULTIES  

   Learning Disabilities   

   Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

   Speech and Communication Disorders  

   General Recommendations

STUDENTS WITH SOCIAL OR BEHAVIORAL PROBLEMS

   Emotional and Behavioral Disorders   

   Autism Spectrum Disorders

   General Recommendations

STUDENTS WITH GENERAL DELAYS IN COGNITIVE AND SOCIAL

FUNCTIONING   

   Intellectual Disabilities

STUDENTS WITH PHYSICAL OR SENSORY CHALLENGES  

   Physical and Health Impairments   

   Visual Impairments

   Hearing Loss  

   General Recommendations  

STUDENTS WITH ADVANCED COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT  

   Giftedness

CONSIDERING DIVERSITY WHEN IDENTIFYING AND ADDRESSING SPECIAL

   NEEDS

GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR WORKING WITH STUDENTS WHO HAVE SPECIAL NEEDS  

WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED?  

PRACTICE FOR YOUR LICENSURE EXAM: QUIET AMY  

 

 

PART II. LEARNING AND MOTIVATION

 

 

Chapter 6: LEARNING, COGNITION, AND MEMORY

CASE STUDY: THE NEW WORLD   

BASIC ASSUMPTIONS OF COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY  

A MODEL OF HUMAN MEMORY  

   The Nature of the Sensory Register

   Moving Information to Working Memory: The Role of Attention

   The Nature of Working (Short-Term) Memory   

   Moving Information to Long-Term Memory: Connecting New Information with

   Prior Knowledge   

   The Nature of Long-Term Memory  

   Learning, Memory, and the Brain  

   Critiquing the Three-Component Model   

LONG-TERM MEMORY STORAGE   

   How Knowledge Can Be Organized  

   How Declarative Knowledge Is Learned  

   How Procedural Knowledge Is Learned  

   Roles of Prior Knowledge and Working Memory in Long-Term Memory Storage

   Encouraging a Meaningful Learning Set and Conceptual Understanding   

   Using Mnemonics in the Absence of Relevant Prior Knowledge  

WHEN KNOWLEDGE CONSTRUCTION GOES AWRY: ADDRESSING

   LEARNERS’ MISCONCEPTIONS

   Obstacles to Conceptual Change   

   Promoting Conceptual Change

LONG-TERM MEMORY RETRIEVAL

   Factors Affecting Retrieval

   Why Learners Sometimes Forget  

DIVERSITY IN COGNITIVE PROCESSES  

   Facilitating Cognitive Processing in Students with Special Needs   

WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED?  

PRACTICE FOR YOUR LICENSURE EXAM: VISION UNIT


 

Chapter 7: COMPLEX COGNITIVE PROCESSES

CASE STUDY: TAKING OVER   

METACOGNITION AND LEARNING STRATEGIES   

   Effective Learning Strategies   

   Factors Affecting Strategy Use  

   Diversity, Disabilities, and Exceptional Abilities in Metacognition

TRANSFER

   Factors Affecting Transfer  

PROBLEM SOLVING  

   Problem Encoding   

   Problem-Solving Strategies: Algorithms and Heuristics  

   Working Memory and Problem Solving  

   Metacognition in Problem Solving

   Using Computer Technology to Teach Problem-Solving Skills

CREATIVITY   

   Fostering Creativity

CRITICAL THINKING  

   Fostering Critical Thinking  

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